Albion Bezel inspiration

Albion Stitch is one of the easiest ways to create a bezel. I was at a bead show when one of my lovely students, Lynn Gosling, brought this bezelled Laboradite cabochon to show me. She was full of enthusiasm about how easy it was to make the bezel fit a slightly uneven stone. I love her use of colour! There are lots of different ways to use Albion Stitch to create bezels, from simple ones to fit even stones, to variations which can accommodate the lumpiest of pieces and any number of corners.

Lynn Gosling's Albion stitch bezel.
Lynn Gosling’s Albion stitch bezel.

I also like the fact that you get to see a lot more of your focal stone using Albion Stitch, which is not always the case with other stitches.

To date I’ve bezelled just about everything from buttons to cheap and cheerful plastic crystals.
The visit from Lynn was timely as I’d just started the process of sorting out my cabochon stash with a promise to self to use them before being tempted to buy more (epic fail on that score!).
This in turn, got me thinking about the many beaders I know who also have a collection of lovely stones in the ‘one day when’ box. As a result I have a new workshop almost ready to teach for the 2014 season. Designed to show and share how to bezel just about any shape, the ‘Sticks and Stones’ class will also take a long look at the beading techniques needed to create links and framing once the stones are bezelled. Perfect for beaders in need of the first steps into designing. A big thank you to Lynn for reminding me about this one lovely aspect of Albion Stitch.

Nature inspired

If I look back through my beading archive, and my textile archive from the days before the bead love got to me; I can see a pattern of figurative work. I love to create forms. The snail on an acanthus leaf, was made for the Beadworker’s Guild annual challenge, which had the title ‘Architectural aspects’. I loved the process of exploring the title, fell in love a little bit with Fibonacci and even more with the process of creating my entry. It’s a marriage of beading and textiles which I made over a two week period.
I enjoy the research stage, the time of promise and possibilities.

'Fibonacci eats the Acanthus leaf of Antiquity'
‘Fibonacci eats the Acanthus leaf of Antiquity’

A few years later I applied the same process to the preparation of my ‘Battle of the Beadsmith’ entry in 2012. Against a field of international Beaders, I knew I wasn’t a giant necklace kind of designer, and calculated that ‘Pretty’ would be plentiful, so I opted for ‘Ugly’. My bead board looked like the autopsy scene from an Alien movie for the longest while. It was also tough to get up close and observational with scorpions. But it was the best fun. I also learned a lot about competition and the psychology of competing. I also found some new ways to play with Albion Stitch. I love the way the stitch can grow from any other beading technique; in the Scorpion figure it grows from Right Angle Weave, Herringbone stitch and Peyote Stitch, giving me a whole new range of combinations to play with. The flower section on the scorpion piece became a new design called Winterfleur.

'Girl with a Scorpion Corsage, A Costume Drama'
‘Girl with a Scorpion Corsage,
A Costume Drama’

I think it is the ability of Albion Stitch to enable me to ‘draw’ with beads that I find most exciting to explore. For me, this figurative work is the work I love to do most, when time permits. it isn’t though, the easiest to break back down into easy to follow steps, it kind of ‘grows’ and there are only so many times you can describe a step as ‘fiddle ’til it fits’! I am though, working on new ‘nature inspired’ designs where the instructions will be a bit kinder to follow!